Please scroll down to view our articles and photos. Thank you for your visit.

 
Home Sunburst Store More Health News/Reports About Us
 






JoAnne Green, Founder/Editor,/Publisher
JoAnne Green














Common Signatures Predict Flu Vaccine Responses in Young and Elderly



photo of summer squash blossom by JoAnne Green


Systems biology study spans multiple flu seasons

What factors inhibit strong responses to seasonal flu vaccines in the elderly? Why do anti-flu antibodies last longer after vaccination in some people?

Answers are emerging from an Emory University-based systems biology analysis of blood samples from more than 400 volunteers who received seasonal flu vaccines. Bali Pulendran, PhD, led a team of researchers who tracked patterns of gene expression, known as molecular signatures, of strong immune responses in volunteers' blood across five consecutive seasons from 2007 to 2011.

The results are scheduled for online publication in Immunity December 15, 2015.

Pulendran, who is senior author of the Immunity paper, is Charles Howard Candler professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and a researcher at Emory's Yerkes National Primate Research Center.

In previous work, Dr. Pulendran and his research collaborators were able to define molecular signatures in blood cells a few days after vaccination. These molecular signatures can predict the strength of the immune response weeks later.

"Until this study, we didn't know whether those signatures would be similar in diverse human populations or across multiple seasons," Pulendran says. "Our results indicate that certain conserved elements of such signatures are indeed similar in the young and elderly as well as across multiple seasons."

The scientists also identified a distinct molecular signature in volunteers when their antibody levels stayed relatively high for several months after vaccination, which could guide efforts to design long-lasting vaccines.

Pulendran's laboratory teamed with systems biology expert Shankar Subramaniam, PhD, co-senior author, and colleagues at University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and analyzed samples from the Hope Clinic of the Emory Vaccine Center and also data from a previous study from Baylor University. Co-first authors of the paper are Helder Nakaya, PhD, now an assistant professor in the School of Pharmaceutical Science at University of São Paulo, and UCSD graduate student Thomas Hagan.

Emory co-authors include Emory Vaccine Center director Rafi Ahmed, PhD, and two others from the Emory School of Medicine, assistant professor Nadine Rouphael, MD, and professor of medicine Mark Mulligan, MD. Additional co-authors include Eva Lee, PhD, at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, and Bonnie Blomberg, PhD, and Daniela Frasca, PhD, at the University of Miami.

While the researchers found people older than 65 tended to have weaker antibody responses to vaccination, there were common elements of molecular signatures that predicted strong antibody responses in younger and older volunteers.

However, elderly volunteers tended to have stronger signatures from immune cells that are not directly involved in producing antibodies (monocytes and 'natural killer' cells), both at baseline and after vaccination. This indicates a potential connection between the baseline state of the immune system in the elderly and reduced responsiveness to vaccination.

"Surprisingly, the signatures capable of predicting antibody responses at four weeks did not correlate with the longevity of antibody responses at six months or a year," Pulendran says. "Rather, a distinct signature was found to correlate with longevity."

In the weeks following the peak of an immune response to a vaccine, most of the antibody-producing cells from the blood die, but some find a permanent home in the bone marrow. The longevity signature appears to be connected to this process, Pulendran says.

"We are currently extending the results of this study to other vaccines to determine whether the signatures of influenza vaccination can be used to predict immune responses to other vaccines, and if, indeed, there is a universal biomarker of antibody responses to vaccination," he continues.



Click here to like us on Facebook.
Click here to like us on Facebook.





Most Viewed Articles

Walking May Help Protect Kidney Patients Against Heart Disease and Infections

Food Helps Older Generation Age Successfully

Cosmetic Treatment Can Open the Door to Bacteria

Food Allergy Nearly Doubles Among Black Children
 
How bacteria communicate with us to build a special relationship

Vegetables Can Make You Look Like a Hero, and a Better Cook

Promising Cervical Cancer Study

Better Broccoli, Enhanced Anti-Cancer Benefits with Longer Shelf Life




 



 
Home  More News/Reports Sunburst Store About Us Privacy Pledge Terms of Use Site Map

Copyright © 2017 Sunburst Worldwide Enterprises. All rights reserved.
Warning: All of the pages on this site are protected under U.S. and International Copyright laws.
Reproduction by any means or for any purpose is not allowed without the express written permission of the copyright owner.
SunburstGlobalHealthNews.com is an online publication of Sunburst Worldwide Enterprises.
By using this website, you agree to our Terms of Use.