Please refresh your browser and scroll down to view our articles & photos. Thank you for your visit.

sunburstglobalhealthnews.com logo
 
Home Sunburst Store More Health News/Reports About Us
 





JoAnne Green, Founder/Editor,/Publisher
JoAnne Green















New Imaging Technique Can Diagnose Common Heart Condition
Posted February 11, 2014

Technique to measure blood flow is first to diagnose aortic disease and may predict complications

human heart A new imaging technique for measuring blood flow in
 the heart and vessels can diagnose a common congenital
 heart abnormality, bicuspid aortic valve, and may lead
 to better prediction of complications.

  A Northwestern Medicine team reported the finding in
 the journal Circulation. In the study, the authors demonstrated for the first time a previously unknown relationship between heart valve abnormalities, blood flow changes in the heart and aortic disease. They showed that blood flow changes were driven by specific types of abnormal aortic valves, and they were able to directly associate blood flow patterns with aortic diseases.

"Blood flow in patients with bicuspid aortic valves was significantly different compared to that in patients with normal valves," said senior author Michael Markl, associate professor of radiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. "We now have direct evidence that bicuspid valves induce changes in blood flow and that the type of flow abnormality may contribute to the development of different expressions of heart disease in these patients."

Bicuspid aortic valve is a heart condition in which the aortic valve only has two leaflets, instead of the normal three. It affects approximately one to two of every 100 Americans and is the most common congenital cardiovascular abnormality. Despite the absence of symptoms, the condition can lead to significant and potentially life-threatening complications, including enlargement of the blood vessel (aneurysm) and rupture. However, it is not known which patients are at the highest risk for complications and whether the condition's origin is genetic or related to changes in blood flow.

The 4D flow MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) used in the study has the potential for better predictive ability.

"The study demonstrated that new imaging techniques may help to determine patient-specific changes in blood flow to better understand which regional areas of the aorta are most prone to developing disease," Markl said. "In addition, the knowledge of abnormal blood flow patterns could be important to better identify patients at risk for the development of heart disease."

Markl's team was surprised to see such a clear distinction between individual expressions of aortic complications for different types of congenital valve disease. While the current findings show evidence of this link, long-term observational studies are needed to better understand the potential of 4D flow MRI to improve disease prediction ability.

A longitudinal follow-up study in patients with bicuspid aortic valves is currently underway at Northwestern.

"Ultimately, we hope that this imaging technique will facilitate early identification of high-risk blood flow patterns associated with progressive aortic enlargement, improving the allocation of health care resources in caring for patients with this prevalent condition," Markl said.

(Source: Northwestern University)

This research was supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), grant R01HL115828, and by Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute NIH grant UL1RR025741. The research also was supported by the Northwestern Memorial Foundation Dixon Translational Research Grants Initiative, American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant and the Northwestern Bicuspid Aortic Valve Program at the Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute.

Click here to like us on Facebook.

Click here to like us on Facebook




Most Viewed Articles

A New Study Reveals the Nutrition, Cost and Safety Benefits of Canned Foods

Blueberries: Small Fruit Delivers
 Big Reward

Walking May Help Protect Kidney Patients Against Heart Disease and Infections

Food Helps Older Generation Age Successfully

Cosmetic Treatment Can Open the Door to Bacteria

Food Allergy Nearly Doubles Among Black Children
 
How bacteria communicate with us to build a special relationship

Vegetables Can Make You Look Like a Hero, and a Better Cook

Promising Cervical Cancer Study

Better Broccoli, Enhanced Anti-Cancer Benefits with Longer Shelf Life




 



 
Home  More News/Reports Sunburst Store About Us Privacy Pledge Terms of Use Site Map

Copyright © 2017 Sunburst Worldwide Enterprises. All rights reserved.
Warning: All of the pages on this site are protected under U.S. and International Copyright laws.
Reproduction by any means or for any purpose, except as specified on certain pages, is not allowed
 without the express written permission of the copyright owner.
SunburstGlobalHealthNews.com is an online publication of Sunburst Worldwide Enterprises.
By using this website, you agree to our Terms of Use.