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point arrow Fighting Obesity – Could It Be as Plain as Dirt?

point arrow Surviving the Snails of Uganda

Quote of the Day:
“Good health and good sense are two of life's greatest blessings.”

point arrow How to Manage Multiple Health Conditions

point arrow Happy Older People Live Longer, Say Researchers

Featured Articles

point arrow Learning About Coronary Heart Disease from Women

vegetable platepoint arrow FDA: Adding Folic Acid to Corn Masa Flour May Prevent Birth Defects
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seniorspoint arrow Health Goes Downhill When Older Adults Stop Driving
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country sidepoint arrow Study: Toxic Metals Found in E-cigarette Liquids
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California popiespoint arrow Preventing Blood Clots With A New Metric for Heart Function
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rainbowpoint arrow Successfully Managing Fatigue in People with Multiple Sclerosis
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apple harvestpoint arrow An Apple a Day Won't Keep the Doctor Away
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rainbowpoint arrow Kidney Failure Risk for Organ Donors 'Extremely Low'
The risk of a kidney donor developing kidney failure in the remaining organ is much lower than in the population at large, even when compared with people who have two kidneys, according to results of new Johns Hopkins research. Please click here to read more.

summer flowerpoint arrow Blood Clot Risk Remains Higher Than Normal for At Least 12 Weeks After Women Deliver Babies.
Women's blood clot risk remains elevated for at least 12 weeks after delivering a baby — twice as long as previously recognized, according to a large study presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2014. Please click here to read more.

almond flowerpoint arrow Promising Cervical Cancer Study
Research on cervical cancer performed by a physician at the University of Arizona Cancer Center at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The multi-site research project by Bradley J. Monk, MD, is expected to change the standard of care for women with advanced cervical cancer. Please click here to read more.

childrenpoint arrow UN: Global child deaths down
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strawberry plantpoint arrow Stress Reduction May Reduce Fasting Glucose in Overweight and Obese Women
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red flowering treepoint arrow Mothers Can Pass Traits to Offspring Through Bacteria's DNA
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a bowl of vegetablespoint arrow 'Simple Living' Reaps Health and Financial Benefits, According to USciences Research
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root vegetablespoint arrow High Sugar Consumption Among Children Relates to Poor Family Functioning
The quality of general family functioning is a major determinant of healthy dietary habits - according to new research published in the Journal of Caries Research and led by Queen Mary University of London. Please click here to read more.

sunsetpoint arrow New Drug May Protect Against Deadly Effects of Nuclear Radiation 24 Hours After Exposure
An interdisciplinary research team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston reports a new breakthrough in countering the deadly effects of radiation exposure. Please click here to read more.

monarch butterflypoint arrow One-minute Test Predicts How Well a Patient May Recover After an Operation
Surgical team discovers that a shortened test to assess frailty can help determine which surgical patients are most at risk for complications.
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daffodilpoint arrow Observing Brain Network Dynamics to Diagnose Alzheimer's Disease
Various types of information can be ascertained by the way blood flows through the brain. When a region of the brain has been activated, blood flow increases and oxygenation rises. Please click here to read more..

magnolia flowerpoint arrow Compound in Magnolia May Combat Head and Neck Cancers
Magnolias are prized for their large, colorful, fragrant flowers. Does the attractive, showy tree also harbor a potent cancer fighter?
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play childrenpoint arrow Is Dietary Supplementation Appropriate for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder?
Not enough and too much are often the result, according to new study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
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peach flowerpoint arrow Why all-nighters don't work: How sleep and memory go hand-in-hand
Brandeis researchers observe an unknown connection between sleep and memory. Please click here to read more.

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point arrow How Very Low Birth Weight Affects Brain Development
Every year, one in ten babies worldwide are born too early. That's roughly 15 million children, according to the World Health Organization. When children are born too soon, they are at higher risk of mental and physical disabilities, especially if they weigh less than 1500 grams at birth.
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white peacockpoint arrowIntestinal Bacteria May Protect Against Diabetes
The most important lifestyle changes included weight loss, more exercise and dietary adjustments to include more whole grain products, fruits and vegetables," according to the researchers at the University of Eastern Finland.
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tropical flowerspoint arrow Focus on Alzheimer’s Disease Shifts to Prevention
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summer flowerspoint arrow Researchers Shed Light on Potential Shield from Alzheimer's
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peacepoint arrow Antibiotics Could Be Alternative to Surgery as Treatment for Appendicitis
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California berriespoint arrow Acupuncture Boosts Effectiveness of Standard Medical Care for Chronic Pain and Depression
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white pumpkinspoint arrow Review Finds Fathers' Age, Lifestyle Associated With Birth Defects
The study, published in the American Journal of Stem Cells, suggest both parents contribute to the health status of their offspring. Please click here to read more.

yellow daffodilpoint arrow Cartilage Protein May Contribute to the Development of Breast Cancer
Research from Lund University in Sweden shows that the protein COMP, which mainly exists in cartilage, can also be found in breast cancer tumors in patients with a poor prognosis. Please click here to read more.

cauliflowerspoint arrow Strength vs. Endurance: Does Exercise Type Matter in the Fight Against Obesity?
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chicken wrapspoint arrow Study provides surprising new clue to the roots of hunger
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summer hedgepoint arrow International Perspectives on Spinal Cord Injury
The new WHO report, "International perspectives on spinal cord injury", summarizes the best available evidence on the causes, prevention, care and lived experience of people with spinal cord injury. Please click here to read more.

vegetablespoint arrow How bacteria communicate with us to build a special relationship
Communication is vital to any successful relationship. Researchers from the Institute of Food Research and the University of East Anglia have discovered how the beneficial bacteria in our guts communicate with our own cells.
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rainbowpoint arrow Antibodies Identified That Thwart Zika Virus Infection
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salmon platepoint arrow One in 10 Globally Suffer from Foodborne Diseases
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mosquito in Africapoint arrow The Hidden Burden of Dengue Fever in West Africa
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Ebola mappoint arrowEbola: New Studies Model a Deadly Epidemic
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baby carrotspoint arrow Children Who Get Vitamin A May Be Less Likely to Develop Malaria
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orange flowerpoint arrow Non-communicable Diseases Prematurely Take 16 Million Lives Annually
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flowering summer squashpoint arrow Food Safety Specialist Hopes New Tracking Strategy Will Lead to Better Intervention
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good health, good sense quote point arrow No More Insulin Injections?
Encapsulated pancreatic cells offer possible new diabetes treatment. Please click here to read more here.

peanutspoint arrow Consumption of Peanuts with a Meal Benefits Vascular Health
A study of peanut consumption showed that including them as a part of a high fat meal improved the post-meal triglyceride response and preserved endothelial function. Please click here to read more.

red winepoint arrow How Drinking Behavior Changes Through the Years
This is the first attempt to harmonize data on drinking behavior from a wide range of population groups over their lifespan with repeated individual measures of consumption. Please click here to read more.

blue berries and cherriespoint arrow Hot Flashes at Younger Age May Signal Greater Cardiovascular Risk
Women who experience hot flashes earlier in life appear to have poorer endothelial function--the earliest sign of cardiovascular disease--than women who have hot flashes later in life...Please click here to read more.

point arrow Five Things You Need to Know About Colorectal Cancer
With March marking Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, here are the answers to some key questions about the disease...Please click here to read more.

red grapespoint arrow Compound Found in Grapes, Peanuts May Help Prevent Memory Loss
A compound found in common foods such as red grapes and peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory, according to new research published by a faculty member in the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. Please click here to read more.

health quote point arrow Experts Recommend Intermediate Physical Activity Goals, Especially for Older Adults
The recommendation that adults should get 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week may be too ambitious for many middle-aged and older adults. Please click here to read more.

American boypoint arrow Food Allergy Nearly Doubles Among Black Children
Children’s food allergies are gradually increasing, but they may be as much as doubling among black children. According to a study published today in the March issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), self-reported food allergy nearly doubled in black children over 23 years. Please click here to read more.

Asian lilypoint arrow Women Don't Get to Hospital Fast Enough During Heart Attack
Women suffering a heart attack wait much longer than men to call emergency medical services and face significantly longer delays getting to a hospital equipped to care for them...Please click here to read more.

sunsetpoint arrow Family Voices and Stories Speed Coma Recovery
Study answers question 'Can he hear me?' with resounding 'Yes'. Please click here to read more.

cereal grains point arrow How Dietary Fiber Helps the Intestines Maintain Health
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crocuspoint arrow Study: Combined Exercise and Nutritional Intervention May Improve Muscle Mass and Function
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allisumpoint arrow Caring for the Caregiver
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magnolia flowerpoint arrow Keeping the Beat – Addressing the Health Challenges of Heart Disease
Congenital heart disease is the No. 1 birth defect in the nation. Forty years ago, most children with congenital heart disease did not survive into adulthood.
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children point arrow Over 23 million children to be vaccinated in mass polio immunization campaign across Middle East
On December 9, 2013, WHO and UNICEF announced that the largest-ever immunization response in the Middle East is under way this week, aiming to vaccinate more than 23 million children against polio in Syria and neighboring countries over the coming weeks. Please click here to read more.

allisumpoint arrow World Malaria Report 2013
Global efforts to control and eliminate malaria have saved an estimated 3.3 million lives since 2000, reducing malaria mortality rates by 45% globally and by 49% in Africa, according to the "World malaria report 2013" published by WHO. Please click here to read more.

children on the beachpoint arrow Pneumonia Still Responsible for One Fifth of Child Deaths
Pneumonia remains the single biggest killer of children under 5 globally, claiming the lives of more than 1 million girls and boys every year. But pneumonia deaths are preventable. Please click here to read more.

a red rosepoint arrow Rediscovering a Culture of Health
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point arrow Research Shows that Simple Treatments Can Help Save the Lives of Babies Who Lack Access to Hospital Care
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blue berries and cherriespoint arrow Maternal Health in India Much Worse Than Previously Thought
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a rosepoint arrow New Method for Better Treatment of Breast Cancer
A new study shows that a novel imaging-based method for defining appropriateness of breast cancer treatment is as accurate as the current standard-of-care and could reduce the need for invasive tissue sampling. Please click here to read more.

good health, good sensepoint arrow Common Signatures Predict Flu Vaccine Responses in Young and Elderly
What factors inhibit strong responses to seasonal flu vaccines in the elderly? Why do anti-flu antibodies last longer after vaccination in some people?
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flowering plum treepoint arrow Should Doctors Cut Back on Some Medicines in Seniors?
Overtreatment for blood pressure & blood sugar can be dangerous for some, according to a report from the University of Michigan Health system.
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monarch butterflypoint arrow Couples more likely to get healthy together
People are more successful in taking up healthy habits if their partner makes positive changes too...Please click here to read more.

point arrow Reduce the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease
During February, Heart Month, the Cardiovascular Institute of New Jersey at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School is promoting the importance of controlling high blood pressure, also called hypertension...Please click here to read more.

apricot blossompoint arrow The Negative Effects of Sitting Time on Health
Sitting for long periods increases risk of disease and death, regardless of exercise, according to University Health Network.
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sleeping child point arrow Infants Create New Knowledge While Sleeping
Sleep improves and structures infant memory, according to researchers from the University of Tübingen, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences. Please click here to read more.

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